Recipe of the Month – Vanilla Slice-and-Bake Cookies

This is an easy cookie recipe. Typically when I make these they are eaten in the first 24 hours. I choose this picture of the cookies as their layout makes the shape of Mickey Mouse. (Disney fans will understand this.)

Ingredients

1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened

1 cup sugar

1 egg

2 t. vanilla extract

1 3/4 cups flour

1/2 t. baking soda

1/4 t. salt

1/2 cup chopped pecans

Directions

Cream butter, gradually add sugar, beating well at medium speed of an electric mixer. Add egg and vanilla, beat well. Combine flour, soda and salt; add to creamed mixture, beating well. Stir in pecans. Shape dough into 2 rolls (about 10 inches long). Wrap in wax paper and chill for at least 2 hours.

Unwrap rolls and cut into 1/4″ slices. (Optional – dip each cookie in cinnamon sugar – see below.) Place slices on cookie sheets sprayed lightly with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes. Cool for 1 minute on cookie sheet; remove to wire racks to cool completely.

Cinnamon sugar – mix 1/4 cups sugar with 1-2 t. cinnamon.

Makes about 4 dozen cookies

Note: Dough can be frozen for up to 3 months. Slice dough while frozen and bake as directed.

#AtoZChallenge 2020 recap

In case you took all of April off from viewing my blog, I participated in the A to Z challenge where each day (except Sundays) you post on a new topic following the letters of the alphabet. So April 1 the blog topic started with A, on April 2 the blog topic began with B and so on.

This was my seventh year doing the challenge. The organizers of the challenge suggest you pick a theme for your writing. The first year I didn’t do a theme. The next year it was TV shows, followed by characters, antagonists, songs about magic and character flaws. This year my theme was comic strips.

This turned out to be a very good topic. I got to review some great classic strips such as Peanuts as well as discover some lesser known strips like Yankee Doodle and Wee Pals. For some of the letters, it was hard to narrow down which comic strip to do. The typical harder letters – Q, X and Z – were not as hard for this one, except for X which there was no comic strips. I filled it in with one of the additional strips from a letter that had many comic strips – F. Family Circus on the actual day scheduled for F and then Fox Trot for my xtra day

As always, I enjoyed the challenge and look forward to doing it again next year.

For any of you who have missed out on my blogs from the A to Z challenge, here is a recap of what I covered.

Previous Posts

A is for Archie

B is for Blondie

C is for Calvin and Hobbes

D is for Dilbert

E is for Ella Cinders

F is for Family Circus

G is for Garfield

H is for Hagar the Horrible

I is for The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil

J is for Joe Palooka

K is for Krazy Kat

L is Li’l Abner

M is for Marmaduke

N is for Non-Sequester

O is for Outland and Opus

P is for Peanuts

Q is for Queen’s Counsel 

R is Rose is Rose

S is for Sally Forth

T is for Terry and the Pirates

U is for U.S. Acres 

V is for The Van Swaggers

W is for Wee Pals

X is for Xtra (FoxTrot)

Y is for Yankee Doodles

Z is for Ziggy

Z is for Ziggy #AtoZChallenge

For this year’s A to Z Challenge, I have chosen the theme of comic strips. For those young ones out there, a comic strip is a few drawn panels telling a story which appears in the newspaper. The first daily comic strip began in 1907, but the color comics (Sunday funnies) actually began back in 1894.

If you are here looking for my typical Thursday post on writing or publishing, I will go back to my regular schedule in May. Until then, enjoy the A to Z Challenge…

Z is for Ziggy, created in 1968 by Tom Wilson. The strip became syndicated in 1971 in 15 newspapers, later growing to over 600 publications. Wilson drew the strip until 1987 when his son Tom Wilson II took over and still draws the strip today.

Ziggy is a short, bald, almost featureless character – except for his large nose. He deals with an endless stream of misfortunes, often in the workplace. With over 50 years in existence, the strip has changed with the times. For example, rotary phones have been replaced with cell phones and the TVs are now flat screens.

Previous Posts

A is for Archie

B is for Blondie

C is for Calvin and Hobbes

D is for Dilbert

E is for Ella Cinders

F is for Family Circus

G is for Garfield

H is for Hagar the Horrible

I is for The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil

J is for Joe Palooka

K is for Krazy Kat

L is Li’l Abner

M is for Marmaduke

N is for Non-Sequester

O is for Outland and Opus

P is for Peanuts

Q is for Queen’s Counsel 

R is Rose is Rose

S is for Sally Forth

T is for Terry and the Pirates

U is for U.S. Acres 

V is for The Van Swaggers

W is for Wee Pals

X is for Xtra (FoxTrot)

Y is for Yankee Doodles

Y is for Yankee Doodles #AtoZChallenge

For this year’s A to Z Challenge, I have chosen the theme of comic strips. For those young ones out there, a comic strip is a few drawn panels telling a story which appears in the newspaper. The first daily comic strip began in 1907, but the color comics (Sunday funnies) actually began back in 1894.

If you are here looking for my typical Wednesday quote, I will go back to my regular schedule in May. Until then, enjoy the A to Z Challenge…

Y is for Yankee Doodles, by Ben Templeton, Don Kracke and Fred W. Martin (though on the strip they only listed their first names). It ran from 1973 to 1977. The comic strip takes place during the American Revolution featuring characters such as George Washington and Ben Franklin in humorous situations.

This strip came out near our bicentennial and when bicentennial fever disappeared, the interest in the strip did too. But not before merchandise such as lunch boxes were produced. After this strip ended, Templeton went on to draw Motley’s Crew, while Martin and Kracke left the syndicated strip world.

Previous Posts

A is for Archie

B is for Blondie

C is for Calvin and Hobbes

D is for Dilbert

E is for Ella Cinders

F is for Family Circus

G is for Garfield

H is for Hagar the Horrible

I is for The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil

J is for Joe Palooka

K is for Krazy Kat

L is Li’l Abner

M is for Marmaduke

N is for Non-Sequester

O is for Outland and Opus

P is for Peanuts

Q is for Queen’s Counsel 

R is Rose is Rose

S is for Sally Forth

T is for Terry and the Pirates

U is for U.S. Acres 

V is for The Van Swaggers

W is for Wee Pals

X is for Xtra (FoxTrot)

X is for Xtra #AtoZChallenge

For this year’s A to Z Challenge, I have chosen the theme of comic strips. For those young ones out there, a comic strip is a few drawn panels telling a story which appears in the newspaper. The first daily comic strip began in 1907 but the color comics (Sunday funnies) actually began back in 1894.

X is for…. well, there are no comic strips that begin with X. There are no comic strip characters that start with X. So, I decided this would be a good day to feature an extra – or rather Xtra – comic strip of my choosing. There are a lot of good ones that I haven’t covered (or won’t cover in the next two posts). It was hard decision, but I went with FoxTrot by Bill Amend.

FoxTrot started as a seven-day a week comic in 1988 but went to Sunday only in December 2006 and still runs on Sundays to this day. At the end of the daily run, the comic strip was in 1,200 newspapers worldwide. FoxTrot follows the Fox family – parents Andrea (Andy) and Roger and their kids – Peter, Paige and Jason. In addition to family humor, the strip has many stories built around fandom (like Star Wars) and popular culture.

Previous Posts

A is for Archie

B is for Blondie

C is for Calvin and Hobbes

D is for Dilbert

E is for Ella Cinders

F is for Family Circus

G is for Garfield

H is for Hagar the Horrible

I is for The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil

J is for Joe Palooka

K is for Krazy Kat

L is Li’l Abner

M is for Marmaduke

N is for Non-Sequester

O is for Outland and Opus

P is for Peanuts

Q is for Queen’s Counsel 

R is Rose is Rose

S is for Sally Forth

T is for Terry and the Pirates

U is for U.S. Acres 

V is for The Van Swaggers

W is for Wee Pals