Hashtags for Authors (updated)

In 2013, I made list of Hashtags for Authors. Three years later, I updated the list. Well, here it is again and once again I have updated the list, checking to make sure each one is still in use and adding a few new ones.

hashtagFor those of you who use Twitter, you are probably already familiar with the idea of hashtags. These are keywords prefixed with a hash or “pound” (#) symbol. They help categorize your tweets and help others easily find tweets about similar subjects.

Used correctly, Twitter hashtags are one of the best ways to connect with readers, industry experts, and other authors.

The use of relevant hashtags increases the likelihood that others will see your post and become a follower. It is a great way to engage a particular community of Twitter users.

The following is a list of some of the hashtags for authors or writers. Most are self-explanatory. If you use any that I missed, please leave them in the comment section and I will add them to the list.

For when you are writing

#amwriting – comments from other authors

#amwritingfiction

#amwritingfantasy

#amwritingscifi

#amwritingromance

#amediting – comments from those in the editing stage

#amrevising – comments from those revising their work

#amreading

#amreadingromance

#editing

#proofreading

#reading

#readingforpleasure

#storytelling

#WIP – work in progress

#writing

#writingtips or #writetip – writing tips from other authors and editors

#writerwednesday – or more often #WW- used to give a shout-out to writers or suggest authors to follow. (#WW also is used by some Weight-Watchers)

General book/writing

#Amazon

#author or #authors

#book or #books

#bookWorm

#ebook or #eBooks

#fiction

#iBooks

#iTunes

#KDP – for Kindle Direct Publishing

#kindle

#KindleBooks

#kindleUnlimited

#Kobo or #kobobooks

#Nook or #NookBook

#novel or #novels

#selfpublishing or #selfpub

#Smashwords

#writer or #writers

Genre-specific

#adventure

#ChickLit

#Childrensfiction

#christfic

#ChristianBooks

#Christianromance

#cookbooks (could also use #food – #cooking – #recipes or such if promoting a cookbook)

#crime or #crimefiction

#DarkFantasy

#Dystopian

#EpicFantasy

#Erotica

#fantasy

#histfic or #historicalfiction or #HistNovel – used for historical fiction

#horror

#humor

#kidlit

#litfic – literary fiction

#mystery

#mysterywriter

#nonfiction

#paranormal

#paranormalromance

#poetry

#romance

#romanticSuspense

#scifi or #ScienceFiction

#short or #shortstory or #shortstories

#specfic – speculative fiction

#suspense

#thriller or #Thrillers

#TrueStory

#womensfiction

#YA – young adult (or #youngadult)

#YAfiction

#YAfantasy

#YAlit

For promotions

#99cent or #99cents or #99c

#authorinterview

#authorRT

#blogtour or #virtualbooktour

#bookbuzz

#bookgiveaway

#bookreview

#excerpt

#fictionFriday

#Fridayreads – promoting what book you are currently reading

#free

#freebook

#FreeDownload

#freeebook

#FreeReads

#giveaway

#Goodreads – relates to the site Goodreads and its followers

#IndieThursday

#interview or #interviews

#kindledeals

#newrelease

#SampleSunday – offering a link to an excerpt or sample of your work

#teaserTuesday Or #TeaserTues- usually a line from your novel and a link to a sample

#WW or #WriterWednesday

Other

#author or #authors

#blurb

#booklover

#bookmarketing

#buyindie

#ereaders

#GreatReads

#novellines or #novelines – when quoting a line from your (or someone else’s) novel

#ff – stands for “follow Friday” where other writers share people to follow (also used by many non-writers)

#indieauthor or #indieauthors

#indie

#indiebook or #indiebooks

#indieThursday

#IndiePub or #IndiePublishing

#mustread

#pubtip – tips on publishing

#readers

Updated list of hashtags for authors

A few years ago, I wrote about Hashtags for authors. This is an updated list of hashtags. (And yes, I checked every one of them to make sure they are still in use.)

hashtagFor those of you who use Twitter, you are probably already familiar with the idea of hashtags. These are keywords prefixed with a hash or “pound” (#) symbol. They help categorize your tweets and help others easily find tweets about similar subjects.

Used correctly, Twitter hashtags are one of the best ways to connect with industry experts, readers, and other authors.

The use of relevant hashtags increases the likelihood that others will see your post and become a follower. It is a great way to engage a particular community of Twitter users.

The following is a list of some of the hashtags for authors or writers. Most are self-explanatory. If you use any that I missed, please leave them in the comment section and I will add them to the list.

For when you are writing

#amwriting – comments from other authors

#amediting – comments from those in the editing stage

#amrevising – comments from those revising their work

#editing

#proofreading

#reading

#storytelling

#WIP – work in progress

#WriteGoal

#WritePrompt or #prompts – if you want to give assignments out.

#writing

#writingtip or #writetip – writing tips from other authors and editors

#writerwednesday – or more often #WW- used to give a shout-out to writers or suggest authors to follow. (#WW also is used by some Weight-Watchers)

General book/writing

#Amazon

#author or #authors

#book or #books

#bookWorm

#ebook

#epub

#epublish

#fiction

#iBooks

#iPad (this brings up many other posts than books)

#iTunes

#KDP – for Kindle Direct Publishing

#kindle

#KindleBooks

#Kobo

#Nook

#novel or #novels

#selfpublishing or #selfpub

#Smashwords

#Sony (this brings up many other posts than books)

#writer or #writers

Genre-specific

#adventure

#ChickLit

#Childrensfiction

#christfic

#ChristianBooks

#Christianromance

#cookbooks (could also use #food – #cooking – #recipes or such if promoting a cookbook) #crime or #crimefiction

#DarkFantasy

#Dystopian

#EpicFantasy

#Erotica

#fantasy

#histfic and #histnovel – used for historical fiction

#horror

#humor

#kidlit

#litfic – literary fiction

#mystery

#mysterywriter

#nonfiction

#paranormal

#poetry

#romance

#romanticSuspense

#scifi

#ScienceFiction

#short or #shortstory or #shortstories

#suspense
#thriller or #Thrillers

#TrueStories

#womensfiction
#YA – young adult

#YAfiction

#YAlit

For promotions

#99cents or #99c

#authorinterview

#authorRT

#blogtour or #virtualbooktour

#bookbuzz

#bookgiveaway

#booklook (for excerpts – currently not popular)

#bookreview

#excerpt

#fictionFriday

#Fridayreads – promoting what book you are currently reading

#free

#freebook

#FreeDownload

#freeebook

#FreeReads

#giveaway

#Goodreads – relates to the site Goodreads and its followers

#IndieThursday

#interview or #interviews

#KindleBargain

#newrelease

#SampleSunday – offering a link to an excerpt or sample of your work

#teaserTuesday Or #TeaserTues- usually a line from your novel and a link to a sample

#WW or #WriterWednesday

Other

#author or #authors

#blurb

#booklover

#bookmarket

#buyindie

#ereaders

#GreatReads

#novellines or #novelines – when quoting a line from your (or someone else’s) novel

#ff – stands for “follow Friday” where other writers share people to follow (also used by many non-writers)

#indieauthor or #indieauthors

#indie

#indiebook or #indiebooks

#IndiePub or #IndiePublishing

#mustread

#pubtip – tips on publishing

#readers

Preparing for an e-book release

CIMG1036So you have written an awesome story, edited it until it shines and formatted it for publication as an e-book. The cover has been designed and the engaging book blurb has been written. You are ready to release your book to the world. So what do you do now? How do you let everyone know about your masterpiece?

This is where planning your e-book launch comes in to play. How much you plan can depend on your own style as well as your time constraints or even how large of a fan base you have.

Many publishing houses plan their book launches months in advance. I haven’t done that with my books. My first two books were released within months of each other because they were already written when I decided to self-publish. So besides my short story, the only book I have released with any sort of real planning was the third book in my trilogy. I published it a few weeks after it was completed with only a little planning.

Soon I will be releasing my next book – The Heir to Alexandria – which I am still editing. So now is the time to plan out my e-book launch. I am hoping to release it mid-January. I have yet to pick an actual date since I am still in the editing process and don’t know how that will go with the holidays upon us.

Here are some things you can do to prepare for an e-book launch. You don’t necessarily need to do all of them. But select those that interest you and plan for them. The more planning you do in advance, the better reception your book will have when released.

Promote on your blog – Announce your release date, reveal your cover or even just write about your upcoming release. All of these can help build anticipation of your new book.

Plan a cover reveal – Some authors go beyond revealing their cover on their own blog. They build anticipation by revealing the new cover on other blogs as well. Several book promoters offer cover reveal packages. For some thoughts on whether a cover reveal is worth it, check out this blog.

Set up a New Release Blog Tour As soon as you have your release date, start lining up appearances on other blogs. Again, you can hire a company to schedule these for you or do it yourself. The goal is to spread the word of your book release by appearing on as many blogs as possible on the week of your release.

Giveaways – This can be used in addition to a new release book tour. You can raffle off a copy or several copies of your book.

E-mail subscriber list/Press release – If you have developed a list of blog followers or fans, you can e-mail them about your new release, perhaps offering them a discounted price. Keep this exclusive to those people. In addition to your e-mail list, you can also write a press release to submit to various new organizations.

Reviews – If you can, try and get some early copies out to reviewers. These really should be done at least 6 weeks before your release – sooner if possible so reviewers have adequate time. Ask for a short review on Amazon or Goodreads and for them to post it on their own blog/website.

Promote on Twitter, Facebook & other websites – You can start building excitement by Tweeting about your upcoming book or perhaps post a few excerpts on your own site or Facebook. There are many other sites that list new releases. This website lists 16 sites though I have not checked them all out.

The main thing is that you need to do SOMETHING. You can’t hope to publish a book with no fanfare and expect it to hit the charts. (Well, you certainly can hope or plan to do that but I think you will be very disappointed.) There are hundreds of books published each day. You need to connect yours to the readers out there who will love your book. And the time to start doing that is BEFORE it is published.

 

W is for Writing Challenges #AtoZChallenge

WWe are almost at the end of the A to Z Challenge. Today’s letter is W. I could write about writer’s block, but I have already covered that in a past post. So I decided to talk about Writing challenges.

I like participating in writing challenges such as the A to Z challenge. (This is technically a blogging challenge, but blogging involves writing so it qualifies in my book.) If I have the time and I see a writing challenge, I will certainly participate. (The key there would be having the time – see my Juggling Jobs post.)

My favorite challenges have been by my local newspaper. Twice they have asked readers to send in a “story” written on Twitter. Yep, that is telling a “story” in only about 125 characters. (It can’t be 140 characters since you have to include their hashtag.)

The first one was in October 2012 when they asked for horror stories for Halloween. Here are two of mine that were published in the newspaper.

His fangs lock on the zombie’s neck. Growling, he thrashes his head as he saves me. Never walk in a graveyard without your dog.

Tap, drag, tap, drag. The harried breathing gets louder as it nears. A zombie? A ghoul? What can it be? Oh, it is just Grandpa.

And the last challenge was this January when they asked us to write romance stories. Here is the one that was published this time. (To see the other, click here.)

Kids arguing, baby crying, dog barking, washing machine overflowing. He comes home with flowers and an “I love you, honey”

Yes, writing challenges can be a great way to stir up some creativity and these Twitter challenges luckily don’t take up a lot of my time. I can only hope our newspaper will come up with a few more.

Perfecting your tweets

twitter feedCommunicating in just 140 characters is not always easy. And getting your message read on a feed full of other people’s tweets is even harder. But there are a few things to do to make your tweets one of the ones that does get read or better yet results such as retweets or people clicking on your links.

Tips

1.) Before you send out a tweet, re-read it. Check the spelling and syntax. Is it easy to read? You have a space of 140 characters to show sloppiness or quality. Make sure your tweets are the best they can be. Think of them as newspaper headlines.

2.) Make the tweet complete. Unless you are tweeting back and forth with someone, readers should be able to read just the current tweet to understand it.

3.) If providing a link (which should be shortened by a service such as btly), be sure to give a reason to click the link. “Must read tips…” or “10 steps to better writing….” Your best bet is to take some valuable piece of information from your post and include it in the tweet. This gives the reader valuable info and entices them to read more.

4.) Limit the number of hastags. Even though these are designed to help you reach others with the same interests, using more than two or three makes it look like spam.

5.) Put the most important information at the beginning as you don’t know how the other person is reading it. For example, if they are using Twitterberry, they only see the first 32 characters.

6.) Make it easier for people to retweet you. That means you can’t use all 140 characters. You need to leave room for “RT @[name]”. Basically, plan for about 120 characters for your message (including hashtags) and 20 characters for retweeting purposes.

7.) Use action verbs.

8.) Use the word “you” in your tweet. Statistically, this gives you a better chance of being retweeted.

There is nothing wrong with using Twitter to promote your book or blog as long as that is not all you do. You need to retweet other’s messages and respond to others. But if you are using it to promote your work, make sure your tweets are the best they can be.

Focusing on Writing: Cutting out time wasting activities

Surprised woman in front of clock uid 1271830I will be the first to admit it – I am not always the best at managing my time. I too easily get sucked into time wasters. You know what I am talking about – those tasks such as checking email and Facebook or surfing the web take up more time that you realize. Unfortunately, those time wasters are stealing my writing time.

Here are some tips to help avoid those time wasters.

1.) Set limits on time suckers

Facebook, Twitter, email and the Internet easily can take up a lot of your time. Now I am not saying you should not work on building relationships with other writers or fans, or you shouldn’t market your other books but you need to set aside a certain time to do it – preferably after you have met your writing goal for the day.

It may help not unplug your network connection if you can’t resist the temptation to surf the web. And while you are at it, turn off your phone.

2.) Write when others aren’t around

The best time to write is when you are alone. It may be during lunch at your empty office or early in the morning before everyone gets up. But people – especially children – can be a great distraction. If you can’t write when no one is around, work on finding a time to write where you can hang a Do Not Disturb sign on your door. If your children are old enough, they can be taught to give you some alone time to write.

3.) Focus on your goal

Know what you want to accomplish when you sit down to write. It could be writing a set number of pages or words, editing a chapter or two or developing a character. Refuse to become involved in anything that doesn’t move you closer to accomplishing your goal. If it helps, let others who will hold you accountable know of your goal. (Next week I will cover how to set realistic writing goals.)

4.) Be Prepared to Write

Authors often talk about finding time to write, but really it isn’t about finding time as much is it about making time to write. Finding time means you are squeezing writing between other activities. The problem with this is that depending on how busy your schedule is you may or may not actually get any writing done.  I am so guilty of this.

Making time to write is proactive. It means you build your schedule around your writing. Knowing that you are going to sit down and write needs to be a conscious choice. Knowing that you are putting writing first makes it easier to ignore things that pop up to interrupt your writing time.

Remember that your writing time should be just for that – writing. You only have a limited amount of time for writing so get to it!

Hashtags for authors

hashtagIf you use Twitter, you are probably familiar with the idea of hashtags. These are keywords prefixed with a hash or “pound” (#) symbol. They help categorize your tweets and help others easily find tweets about similar subjects. The use of relevant hashtags increases the likelihood that others will see your posts and is a great way to engage a particular community of Twitter users such as readers or other authors.

The following is a list of some of the hashtags for authors or writers. Most are pretty self-explanatory.

For when you are writing

#amwriting – comments from other authors

#amediting – comments from those in the editing stage

#editing

#proofreading

#writingtip or #writetip – writing tips from other authors and editors

#writerwednesday – or more often #WW- used to give a shout-out to writers or suggest authors to follow

#Fridayreads – promoting what book you are currently reading

#fictionFriday

#ff – stands for “follow Friday” where other writers share people or sites to follow

#pubtip – tips on publishing

General book/writing

#book

#novel or #novels

#fiction

#ebook

#kindle

#sony

#nook

#epub

#author or #authors

#writer or #writers

#writing

#Nook

#kobo

#Amazon

#Smashwords

#selfpublishing or #selfpub or #self-publish

Genre-specific

#short or #shortstory or #shortstories

#litfic – literary fiction

#histfic and #histnovel – used for historical fiction

#womensfiction

#scifi

#fantasy

#romance

#paranormal

#horror

#crime or #crimefiction

#suspense

#thriller

#adventure

#christfic

#kidlit

#YA – young adult or #YAlit

#humor

#cookbooks

#mystery

#mysterywriter

#poetry

For promotions

#bookgiveaway

#free

#freebook

#freeebook

#newrelease

#SampleSunday – offering a link to an excerpt or sample of your work

#teaserTuesday – usually a line from your novel and a link to a sample

#excerpt

#interview or #interviews

#bookreview

#blogtour or #virtualbooktour

Other

#novellines or #novelines – when quoting a line from your (or someone else’s) novel

#indieauthor or #indieauthors

#indie or #indies

#indiebooks

#buyindie

#indiepub or #indiepublishing

#booklook

#booklover

#mustread

#readers

Please feel free to comment below and add to this list…